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VOLUME VIII


VOLUME VIII

ST. BASIL:

LETTERS AND SELECT WORKS

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Volume VIII

Letter CCCLXVI

Preface

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This translation of a portion of the works of St. Basil was originally begun under the editorial supervision of Dr. Wace. It was first announced that the translation would comprise the De Spiritu Sancto and Select Letters, but it was ultimately arranged with Dr. Wace that a volume of the series should be devoted to St. Basil, containing, as well as the De Spiritu Sancto , the whole of the Letters, and the Hexaemeron. The De Spiritu Sancto has already appeared in an English form, as have portions of the Letters, but I am not aware of an English translation of the Hexaemeron, or of all the Letters. The De Spiritu Sancto was presumably selected for publication as being at once the most famous, as it is among the most valuable, of the extant works of this Father. The Letters comprise short theological treatises and contain passages of historical and varied biographical interest, as well as valuable specimens of spiritual and consolatory exhortation. The Hexaemeron was added as being the most noted and popular of St. Basil's compositions in older days, and as illustrating his exegetic method and skill, and his power as an extempore preacher.

The edition used has been that of the Benedictine editors as issued by Migne, with the aid, in the case of the De Spiritu Sancto , of that published by Rev. C. F. H. Johnston.

The editorship of Dr. Wace terminated during the progress of the work, but I am indebted to him, and very gratefully acknowledge the obligation, for valuable counsel and suggestions. I also desire to record my thanks to the Rev. C. Hole, Lecturer in Ecclesiastical History at King's College, London, and to Mr. Reginald Geare, Head Master of the Grammar School, Bishop's Stortford, to the former for help in the revision of proof-sheets and important suggestions, and to the latter for aid in the translation of several of the Letters.

The works consulted in the process of translation and attempted illustration are sufficiently indicated in thenotes.

London, December, 1894.

Genealogical Tables

CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE TO ACCOMPANY THE LIFE OF ST. BASIL

A.D.

329 or 330. St. Basil born.

335.

Council of Tyre.

336.

Death of Arius.

337.

Death of Constantine.

340.

Death of Constantine II.

341.

Dedication creed at Antioch.

343.

Julian and Gallus relegated to Macellum.

Basil probably sent from Annen to school at Cæsarea.

344.

Macrostich, and Council of Sardica.

346.

Basil goes to constantinople.

450.

Death of Constans.

351.

Basil goes to constantinople.

1st Creed of Sirmium.

353.

Death of Magnentius.

355.

Julian goes to Athens (latter part of year).

356.

Basil returns to Cæsarea.

357.

The 2d Creed of Sirmium, or Blasphemy, subscribed by Hosius and Liberius.

Basil baptized, and shortly afterwards ordained reader.

358.

Basil visits monastic establishments in Egypt, Syria, Palestine, and

Mesopotamia, and retires to the monastery on the Iris.

359.

The 3d Creed of Sirmium. Dated May 22. Councils of Seleucia and Ariminum.

360.

Acacian synod of Constantinople.

Basil, now ordained Deacon, Disputes with Aetius.

Dianius subscribes the Creed of Ariminum, and

Basil in consequence leaves Cæsarea.

He visits Gregory at Nazianzus.

361.

Death of Constantius and accession of Julian.

Basil writes the "Moralia."

362.

Basil returns to Cæsarea.

Dianius dies. Eusebius baptized, elected, and consecrated bishop.

Lucifer consecrates Paulinus at Antioch.

Julian at Cæsarea. Martyrdom of Eupsychius.

363.

Julian dies (June 27). Accession of Jovian.

364.

Jovian dies. Accession of Valentinian and Valens.

Basil ordained prieset by Eusebius.

Basil writes agains eunomius.

Semiarian council of Lampsacus.

365.

Revolt of Procopius.

Valens at Cæsarea.

366.

Semiarian deputation to Rome satisfy Liberius of their orthodoxy.

Death of Liberius. Damasus bp. of Rome.

Procopius defeated.

367.

Gratian Augustus.

Valens favours the Arians.

Council of Tyana.

368.

Semiarian Council in Caria. Famine in Cappadocia.

369.

Death of emmelia. Basil visits Samosata.

370.

Death of Eusebius of Cæsarea.

Election and consecration of Basil to the see of Cæsarea.

Basil makes visitation tour.

371.

Basil threatened by arian bishops and by modestus.

Valens, travelling slowly from Nicomedia to Cæsarea, arrives at the end of the year.

372.

Valens attends great service at Cæsarea on the Epiphany, Jan. 6.

Interviews between basil and valens.

Death of Galates.

Valens endows Ptochotrophium and quits Cæsarea.

Basil visits Eusebius at Samosata.

Claim of Anthimus to metropolitan dignity at Tyana.

Basil resists Anthimus.

Basil Forces Gregory of Nazianzus to be consecrated bishop of Sasima, and consecrated his brother Gregory to Nyssa. Consequent estrangement of Basil and Gregory of Nazianzus.

Basil in Armenia. Creed signed by Eustathius.

373.

St. Epiphanius writes the "Anacoratus."

Death of Athanasius.

Basil visited by Jovinus of Perrha, and by Sanctissimus of Antioch.

374.

Death of Auxentius and consecration of Ambrose at Milan.

Basil writes the "De Spiritu Sancto."

Eusebius of Samosata banished to Thrace.

Death of Gregory, bp. of Nazianzus, the elder.

375.

Death of Valentinian. Gratian and Valentinian II. Emperors.

Synod of Illyria, and Letter to the Orientals.

Semiarian Council of Cyzicus.

Demosthenes harasses the Catholics.

Gregory of Nyssa deposed.

376.

Synod of Iconium.

Open denunciation of Eustathius by Basil.

378.

Death of Valens, Aug. 9.

Eusebius of Samosata and Me

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